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The Value of Social Media in Upfront Season

From Shareablee

Six weeks into upfront season and there is no shortage of broadcasters hawking their new and returning programming initiatives. Through May 18th (when The CW and NBC Universal Cable step to the stage), dozens of outlets – cable now, then digital and broadcast – present their plans to prospective advertisers, media buyers and members of the press.

Digital follows the cable portion of the upfront in what is referred to as the NewFront. And, the week May 15th are the broadcast networks of ABC, CBS, NBC, Fox and The CW.

Fasten your seatbelts.

For all media outlets, the collective goal in the upfront (and NewFront) is to convince media buyers to commit to advertising deals for TV shows months away, or even the following year. And, for any outlet in search of an audience in an environment where a record number of scripted series (over 500) are expected to be competing, building a social audience prior to premiering, and after the debut, is often the key ingredient in finding those elusive eyeballs.

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Written by Marc Berman

Marc Berman has been writing professionally since 1999 and is the author of weekly column “Mr. Television” for Campaign US (www.campaignlive.com). Most recently, Berman was the creator and Editor-in-Chief of website and newsletter TV Media Insights for Cross MediaWorks. From 1999-2011, he was the Senior Editor for Mediaweek and has also written for The New York Daily News, Variety, The Hollywood Reporter and Emmy Magazine, among others. Berman has also appeared on “Entertainment Tonight,” “Extra,” “Access Hollywood,” “Inside Edition,” “The CBS Evening News,” E!, CNN, CNBC, Fox News and MSNBC.

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  • renamoretti1

    Given that the networks fail to gather eyeballs, perhaps they should stop trying to appear “cool” and “in” by talking social media and make good shows people will actually want to watch…

    I also love that “500 TV shows – most ever” nonsense, which was found by a “Study” nobody ever checked and which obfuscates the fact that there may be more TV shows (counting foreign shows by the way) but there’s next to no movies and minis and the “shows” are now just a few episodes long…