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Netflix to Reboot Norman Lear Sitcom ‘One Day at a Time’

Thirteen Episodes Have Been Ordered

Netflix has confirmed it will be reviving Norman Lear sitcom “One Day at a Time” with a Latino cast. The original sitcom, which starred Bonnie Franklin, Valerie Bertinelli, Mackenzie Phillips and Pat Harrington, Jr., ran on CBS from 1975 to 1984 and focused on a newly divorced mother and her two daughters moving to Indianapolis. This new version will feature three generations of a family living under one roof. The scoop: The lead is a recently divorced former military mother navigating a new single life while raising her radical teenaged daughter and socially adept tween son with the “help” of her old-school Cuban-born mother (Rita Moreno) and building manager named Schneider.

Thirteen episodes of this new version of “One Day at a Time,” which follows in the footsteps of “Fuller House,” have been ordered. Lear, 93, will be one of the producers on the series.

onedayatatime

Written by Marc Berman

Marc Berman

Marc Berman has been writing professionally since 1999 and is the author of the “Mr. Television” for Campaign US (www.campaignlive.com). Most recently, Berman was the creator and Editor-in-Chief of website and newsletter TV Media Insights for Cross MediaWorks. From 1999-2011, he was the Senior Editor for Mediaweek and has also written for The New York Daily News, Variety, The Hollywood Reporter and Emmy Magazine, among others. Berman has also appeared on “Entertainment Tonight,” “Extra,” “Access Hollywood,” “Inside Edition,” “The CBS Evening News,” E!, CNN, CNBC, Fox News and MSNBC.

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  1. How is this a re-boot? Except for the lead being a single mother and a (new) character named “Schneider,” there’s nothing about this new show that ties to One Day At A Time. Why not just create a new show and not tarnish the reputation of what some might consider a classic, if (when) this one isn’t as good.

      • Agree with you Marc.

        The “logic” is straight out of MBA programs.

        The “idea” is that in a “scattered market” it is important to have “pre-awareness” for project and “branded” titles for shows.

        Of course the fact that audiences again and again reject those remakes doesn’t seem to erode the belief in the E-Suite that what they learned in school has to be right even though it was never meant to apply to TV and movies…

  2. Once again Netflix goes the remake route.

    How that makes them “edgy”, “original” or “daring” compared to the major networks or cable is beyond me…